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Bardez

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About Bardez

  • Birthday 08/10/1984

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    Male
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    Peoria, IL, USA
  • Interests
    To be keeping a secret.
  • Mods Worked On
    Baldur's Gate Trilogy

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  1. Just as an overview for DXT compression, it's worth mentioning that DXT1 and DXT5 are 16-bit color compression algorithms, so standard 32 bit colors are converted into 16-bit color, then split into 4x4 squares and lossily compressed according the the specified algorithm. It makes me chuckle a bit how the 32-bit color renders that were preserved immediately get axed down to 16-bit color. A final note on the DXT1 and DXT5 compression algorithms: If you follow the Wikipedia article's algorithm, Read the colors as unsigned 2-byte shorts. These values indicate whether color0 > color1
  2. Speaking to the PVRZ format itself, I'll reiterate what Avenger pointed out to consolidate information. In a PVRZ file, as Avenger pointed out here, the first 4 bytes (DWORD) indicate the uncompressed data size. There is no header indicating the type or version. The remainder of the data is the ZLib-compressed pvr file (for .NET people, there is a difference between Deflate and ZLib, so specifying is helpful). If you go to imgtec, there are apparently utilities that can read pvr files and Photoshop plugins for them.
  3. I'm quoting Avenger from the BGEE thread: I have found that some pvrz files in BG2:EE have DXT5-compressed pixels. Anyone supporting PVRZ generally should be prepared to implement both DXT1 and DXT5. You can find algorithms to do so on Wikipedia (DXT1; DXT5). I can only anecdotally say that MOSxxxxx use DTX5 based on the 12 or so test files that I am currently using, but cannot yet say with a lot of certainty what the pattern of files that use DXT5 are, but I'll look into that once I have PVR decoding/displaying properly. I would hazard a guess that the MOSxxxxx images which might hav
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